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SportsShooter.com: Member Message Board

COPYLEFT
Michael Myers, Photographer
Miami | Florida | USA | Posted: 12:31 PM on 11.07.16
->> I wonder what would happen if instead of adding a COPYRIGHT notice to my photos, I instead used COPYLEFT.

http://www.ozy.com/fast-forward/forget-copyright-think-copyleft/66613

Lots to consider.....

I'm retired. I'm mostly shooting for fun, just because I enjoy it. I think I'll change my 'watermark' and see what happens..... :-)
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Bryan Woolston, Photographer
Louisville | KY | USA | Posted: 2:39 PM on 11.07.16
->> If I were to copyleft, or in other words, offer you work to someone for free, how how would I pay rent. Would the grocery store offer a creative commons isle where I could grab a free cart of food? Perhaps the camera store would offer free cameras, or airlines would offer free flights to my next assignment? No, I doubt it. This concept is ridiculous.

Free photography is flooding the market with average imagery that devalues the work of professionals.

This is only possible because 32% of 30 year olds are just as happy living with their parents...

http://www.latimes.com/business/la-fi-millennials-live-at-home-20160524-sna...
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Mike Janes, Photographer
Attica | NY | USA | Posted: 1:22 AM on 11.08.16
->> Not sure how you got that conclusion, first 32% covers ages 18-34, very large group; second it mentions many of the factors that go into staying at home longer like stagnant wages, record breaking college debt, college taking longer, surging rent, unable to find jobs, etc. These have had negative effects on several parts of life, including as the article says waiting longer to settle down. None of this is new, believe it was TIME that did a cover story on this trend about ten years ago, remember reading it as I was someone who stayed home longer while getting three degrees and concentrating on building a business, it sure wasn't because I was happy to be there, it was necessity.

Honestly most of those I see out there happily flooding the market are people in their 40-60's who have money and time to waste. The percentage of people I can think of doing this in the upper age brackets to millennials is not even close. Right off the top of my head thought of two millennials and fifteen 40+. The one millennial though is so bad you could almost count him as a dozen.

As for OP, the millennials are the "sharing generation", I see it all the time when they're asking for free photos, just email me that. Also see it in young front office people, they just send out photos to anyone who asks not even thinking about copyrights, or they are doing things on their own and stealing left and right not thinking about it, they're so used to sharing everything without thinking it's scary.
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Jim Colburn, Photographer
Omaha | NE | USA | Posted: 12:11 PM on 11.08.16
->> Why do Millennials have to come up with silly terms like "Copyleft" for a concept that has been around for more than 100 years? It's called Public Domain.
Jeez.
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Mike Janes, Photographer
Attica | NY | USA | Posted: 2:45 PM on 11.08.16
->> Well, the term was first used in 1976 before millennials were born, though it didn't reflect the concept which first appeared in 1985. However, it's not public domain, it's a little more in depth than that and has restrictions. Yes I just learned all this in the last 24 hours, had never even heard the term before this post!
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Sam Santilli, Photographer, Photo Editor
Philippi | WV | USA | Posted: 7:58 AM on 11.10.16
->> "Culture isn't property" Just what Karl Marx taught. You wanna create and give away your creations because you dwell in your parents' basement, have at it. But once you start paying your own way in life, I am sure communist ideals will give way to capitalist realism.
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Michael Myers, Photographer
Miami | Florida | USA | Posted: 10:49 PM on 11.16.16
->> I'm not sure why it has to be an either/or choice.

No reason why professional photographers can't continue to copyright their work, while amateurs who are just in it for the enjoyment could copyleft their work.

If I was earning my living nowadays from photography, I'd be in the first group, but being retired and just shooting for enjoyment, I feel like I'm in the second.

What would bother me though, and what copyleft resolves, is nobody else could make a profit from my work (well, legally, at least).

No reason why "Communist ideals" and" capitalist realities"" can't co-exist.
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Andrew Brosig, Photo Editor, Photographer
Tyler | TX | United States | Posted: 7:25 AM on 11.20.16
->> I think the second paragraph of Bryan Woolston's post is most important to note. Far too many companies and organization which once purchased photography services from professionals have adopted a "good enough is good enough" attitude, driven primarily (or completely) by the abundance of "GWC" or "MWC" shooters out there.

The increased quality/reduced costs of modern digital cameras have driven so many individuals who would never before have thought about photography beyond family snap shots into the "business." That is not to say there aren't hundreds or thousands of very talented individuals out there, turning out some high-quality images on a part-time basis or "just for fun."

It's true, finances are dear across the board now, in the current economic climate. I think part of the problem is what I call the "dumbing down" of the modern consumer - not the companies which formerly bought photographic services, but the end-user, the consumer, who's gotten used to seeing "good enough" images.

All that said, if someone wants to provide their photographs for free, we'll never stop them. Nor can we ever stop the companies and organizations from utilizing these free services.

There. Rant over.
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Michael Myers, Photographer
Miami | Florida | USA | Posted: 9:51 AM on 11.29.16
->> Just a short comment on your last paragraph:

"All that said, if someone wants to provide their photographs for free, we'll never stop them. Nor can we ever stop the companies and organizations from utilizing these free services."

There was a time in my long-ago past, where just seeing my name under a published photo was all the compensation I needed or expected. I had a "real job" during the day, and when I started submitting photos to one of the radio control car racing magazines, having my name in print mattered far more than the small amount of money they might have paid me (but didn't).


When photography becomes a job, and the income is needed to live on, things are different, but I suspect there are a huge number of reasonably competent photo hobbyists, who would be as thrilled as.I was at getting "my" picture published, with my name under it. Was great "bragging rights" when my friends noticed too! :-)


I suspect that is the real reason why all those people want to "sell" their work for so little, and a lot of them are getting reasonably talented (with the electronics making up for all the things that were so difficult in the past, exposure, focusing, and so on......
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Jack McCoy, Photographer
Baldwin | NY | USA | Posted: 10:15 AM on 11.29.16
->> Wait for it.......
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Thread Title: COPYLEFT
Thread Started By: Michael Myers
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