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SportsShooter.com: Member Message Board

Dead Nikon D300 from a Compact Flash card????
Joey Wilson, Photographer
Savannah | GA | USA | Posted: 5:51 PM on 04.07.12
->> Put a Sandisk ExtremeIII 4GB card in my D300 to read - entire camera went dead. No response, will not power on, nothing in counter window at all. After cussing a bit, pulled the card and put in a second D300 body I have so I could finish my job. SAME THING HAPPENS on the second D300 body - completely dead. I can't power it on, nothing showing in the frame counter window at all - just blank.

Could this card have caused both my D300 bodies to die when I put it in them?? Had used that card many, many times before and it was the second card of three that I had used to shoot a Lacrosse game that day and had no issues with it them....

Any help would be apprecitated. Tips or previous fixes appreciated too.

-Joey
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Gray Quetti, Photographer
Jacksonville | Fl | USA | Posted: 8:25 PM on 04.07.12
->> Hi Joey, I have no clue but using the Q & A on weekends works pretty good. Might want to try it.
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Eric Canha, Photographer
Brockton | MA | United States | Posted: 8:26 PM on 04.07.12
->> Joey in theory if the card has developed a dead short it is possible that it shorted the power supply that feeds the card and thus killing the camera. I once had a very old 24-70 that killed the AF on multiple cameras before it was discovered.

Don't beat yourself up too bad. I think that 99.9% of us would have put that card into the backup body to keep on shooting and thus killed body #2 too.
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Robert Hanashiro, Photographer
Los Angeles | CA | | Posted: 8:35 PM on 04.07.12
->> Oh boy .... Sounds like you have what is known as a "killer card".

I had a CF card burn out the card reader in four cameras before the NPS Repair Center figured it out --- by burning out two of their cameras as we searched for the "killer card" which I had put back in with my stash of 20 CD cards.

If this is indeed a "killer card" DO NOT put it into another camera.

As it was explained to me by the Nikon repair tech, an internal short of some kind is sending current through one of the pins (probably the ground) and that is burning out your camera. Doesn't take much current to do that.

I can't saw 100% that is the problem. But it sure sounds like what happened to me and several other photographers last year.

(After I had the problem, I sent out an email to about 100 shooters in my address book and three reported the same exact problem I had.)

If you know what card it is that caused this, send it to the maker --- they probably will replace the card. But if it's like my episode, they won't pay the repair bills.
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Robert Hanashiro, Photographer
Los Angeles | CA | | Posted: 8:36 PM on 04.07.12
->> The Nikon Tech I worked with is the one that called the CF card a "killer card". (Just so no one thinks this was something I came up with.)
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Butch Miller, Photographer
Lock Haven | PA | USA | Posted: 9:05 PM on 04.07.12
->> About two years ago I had a killer card too ... fried the card readers in two D200 bodies ... camera still functioned, but could not write to card ... To ensure I eliminated the problem, I dumped all the cards and card readers I was using at the time ... haven't had it reoccur ...
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Yamil Sued, Photographer, Photo Editor
Peoria | AZ | USA | Posted: 9:16 PM on 04.07.12
->> Robert,

Thanks for that piece of information.

I had a Killer reader about 4 years ago, I was working in the studio and a D3 that had just come back from NPS for a new sensor and a new shutter on a new body. I started shooting and the Images came out unreadable on Photo Mechanic, and the Images on the card were corrupted too. I tried again and it was the same. I went to the extreme to pack the body back up again and take it to the UPS Store, when I started to shoot with my backup D300. The same thing happened with a different card and the same reader. Then I formatted the card and tried again on a new Firewire reader and everything was OK!! I ran back to the UPS Store and picked up the D3 I had just sent out and tried it with the same card and the Firewire reader and the problem was gone!! That saved me time and money.

I promptly threw away the offending reader and got new ones. I can't believe that a cheap part like the reader could cause so much grief.

Joey, dont feel bad, I would have done exactly the same thing you did too. Now that I know this, I will always keep this in mind.
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Robert Hanashiro, Photographer
Los Angeles | CA | | Posted: 9:37 PM on 04.07.12
->> Actually that does not sound like the same problem, but certainly scary as well.

It just shows you that we cannot be careless in handling cards. A according to the card company, the offending CF card was damaged by "impact" --- though a careful inspection by me (even using a magnifier) did not show any outside dents or abuse.

Our tendency is to take an unreadable card out of one camera and put it into another. My recommendation is not to do that.

(Also of note: The "killer card" showed up fine when placed in a card reader on a computer. No sign at all that there was a problem --- all of the files were readable. That's why I tossed it into a pile of other card after it was ingested. BIG mistake!)
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Joey Wilson, Photographer
Savannah | GA | USA | Posted: 9:40 PM on 04.07.12
->> Thanks guys..........

The "offending" card has already been segregated and made impossible to fit in another body.

Now my scary question...what has this done to my body's?? What exactly did I fry and more importantly, can it be repaired and if so, anyone have a guess on the cost to repair the bodies?? ??

thanks
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Dave Prelosky, Photographer
Lower Burrell | Pa | US | Posted: 9:54 PM on 04.07.12
->> Perhaps not exactly the same, but my D700 quit not too long ago after I caught a whiff of smoke with it up to my face. It came back as a (camera) card reader problem with a tab of about $250. It also came with the dread "parts hold" and took six weeks to complete.

Just be sure to ask NPS if you can have the loaner till the repair is done, or the nominal two weeks...
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Robert Hanashiro, Photographer
Los Angeles | CA | | Posted: 10:27 PM on 04.07.12
->> Probably the card reader is fried. My repairs were about $375 a body.

The card company as I said, replaced the card.
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Yamil Sued, Photographer, Photo Editor
Peoria | AZ | USA | Posted: 10:32 PM on 04.07.12
->> Joey,

There should be no problem repairing your cameras, They will cost you though, the B1 Repair is about $211.68 + Taxes and Shipping and the B2 Repair is $348.32 +Taxes and Shipping.

Fill up this form:

http://form.nikonimagesvcapprove.com/

Send them to Melville and contact NPS to arrange for Loaners.

Y
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Nina Zhito, Photographer
Bay Area | CA | | Posted: 11:50 AM on 04.08.12
->> this is an instructive but scary thread. any ideas what would make a previously stable card go rogue all of a sudden?
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Robert Hanashiro, Photographer
Los Angeles | CA | | Posted: 1:05 PM on 04.08.12
->> I talked to several levels of "tech support" on this with the usual canned responses. Finally through a friend of a friend I talked to a couple of the company's engineers and sent the card directly to them.

Apparently impact can damage the internal workings and in the most extreme can cause the issue that burned out the card readers in four of my cameras (and two at Nikon Repair).

Memory cards have come a long way from the fragile ones we used years ago (remember the IBM MicroDrive???) to what we're using now. We think they are "indestructible" --- how many stories have you heard of photographers leaving them in pockets and running them through the washer and dryer or having them run over by an assistant???

The lessons I learned:
- If a card comes up as unreadable in one camera it does not go into another camera "just to check if it's working"
- I don't play table football with them (meaning I treat them now with a higher level of care I used to) and I don't carry them around loose in a bag or case or pocket

'Nuff Said!
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Joey Wilson, Photographer
Savannah | GA | USA | Posted: 2:14 PM on 04.08.12
->> @ Nina...
No idea why this card did this. I don't treat them roughly and tend to give all of my cards that are in my rotation the same treatment, so I just can't explain why this card caused the issue all of a sudden.

@ Robert - lesson learned on my part. If I ever put another card in a body and the body dies, you can bet your sweet @$$ that I'll never put it in another body!!

In hindsight, I wish I had thought about that at the time, but unfortunately, I assumed it was the body and not the card, so I pulled the card and put it in the nearest second body I had to get the images to my computer......
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Michael Fischer, Photographer
Spencer | Ia | USA | Posted: 2:37 PM on 04.08.12
->> Robert,
I certainlt remember Microdrives (more like I remember the nightmares those things could cause...).

Exceptionally instructive thread. Thanks for posting Joey. I'm fortunate so far that I've never experienced it.

Michael
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Tim Cowie, Photographer
Davidson | NC | USA | Posted: 7:23 PM on 04.08.12
->> Anyone who questions the $25 membership fee for Sportsshooter may just have save themselves $100's in the future by reading this and many other threads.

I too, have taken a bad card and tried it in another camera. Thanksfully, I did not have the same results. Won't ever do that again and consider my yearly $25 well spent.
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Scott Miller, Photographer
Sorrento | FL | | Posted: 8:46 PM on 04.08.12
->> Joey

Just had this happen to one maybe two D3 bodies.

One way to tell if you body is fried is to smell the card slot.. it may smell like burnt electric.

As Robert said it is about $375 to repair...
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Joey Wilson, Photographer
Savannah | GA | USA | Posted: 9:17 PM on 04.08.12
->> Scott....
Just did your "smell test".......first body did indeed have that burnt wire smell inside the card slot....couldn't tell as much on the second body, but since both are now nothing more than paperweights, I'll assume I fried both bodies.....

This just sucks so much.....will probably send the off tomorrow, but I know I will not get them back before a big shoot I had planned for May 1......down to one body and very nervous about it too.....
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Wesley Bunnell, Photographer
North Branford | CT | | Posted: 11:57 PM on 04.08.12
->> I dont know if this is the same issue but I recently had a problem with a D700. I started getting a "CHA" error with any of my cards. Tried the usual suggestions I found online and nothing worked. After sending it in they found the main image processing board needed to be replaced. I was a little bummed since the camera was out of warranty but still only had about 2,000 actuations.

I tried my cards in another D700 and every one worked fine except for one. I got the same "CHA" error as on my other D700 with this one card. I didnt think about sending it back to the company and immediately tossed it in the trash. I didn't want to take the chance on needing another repair.

If it was the card that caused the problem thankfully it didnt damage my 2nd body by trying it. After the repair everything has been fine with all cards and on both bodies.
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Joey Wilson, Photographer
Savannah | GA | USA | Posted: 2:48 PM on 04.09.12
->> Anyone had any experience with "Camera Service Company" in Smyrna, GA (authorized Nikon Repair) ??

Can't get any answer from Southern Tech Photo Service where I normally send my gear for maintenance and repairs..???

thanks
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Yamil Sued, Photographer, Photo Editor
Peoria | AZ | USA | Posted: 3:15 PM on 04.09.12
->> Send it to Nikon USA, you will not regret it!!

They have the know how and they have the parts.

You will get it back within one week.

Y
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Dave Prelosky, Photographer
Lower Burrell | Pa | US | Posted: 3:43 PM on 04.09.12
->> Yamil - At the risk of sounding contrary, I'd edit that statement to "They have the know how, and will eventually have the parts."
My D700 took SIX WEEKS, door-to-door with a card induced reader failure. Four of those were due to the ever popular Parts Hold. For some odd reason it seems everything I send to Melville takes much longer than the nominal two week turnaround.
As I said above, Joey - contact NPS right now and ask about a loaner. Then confirm the loan will be good through your repair turnaround.
If you haven't joined NPS....
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Joey Wilson, Photographer
Savannah | GA | USA | Posted: 4:45 PM on 04.09.12
->> Dave...
thanks for the info.... I am not a member of NPS - according to the rules, you must be a full-time photographer and that, I am not unforunately. I have a full time job with a printing/marketing company and have my photography business on the side.......
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Steven Georges, Photographer
Garden Grove | CA | USA | Posted: 4:51 PM on 04.09.12
->> We can only hope that when they created the XQD card they had this in mind and designed the electronics so a card could not cause damage to a camera.
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Yamil Sued, Photographer, Photo Editor
Peoria | AZ | USA | Posted: 8:42 PM on 04.09.12
->> Dave, I have had that Parts Hold before, One time, I couldn't get a loaner due to the World Series, but every other time, the parts hold don't affect me much, thanks to NPS.

But OTOH, if you are not an NPS member, the problem is there and must be accounted for.

But I trust Nikon Repair more than any other independent shop out there.

I just got back two of my D3's and a 70-20 VR1, they did a superb job, like always!! These two bodies go back to Nikon every year, for a total clean up and check!! It's worth the $211.68 I pay for a B1 Repair!! One is over 220K and the other one will reach 200K very soon. And this particular lens gets lots of use!!
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Michael Chen, Assistant, Photographer
Saratoga | CA | USA | Posted: 7:45 AM on 04.10.12
->> About two years ago one of the card slots in my D3 went bad and I initially blamed the card, but the card worked fine in other cameras. No card worked in that card slot, so I eventually concluded that the slot was bad.

Nikon sorted it out for me when I had that camera serviced.

All of my numerous memory cards that I've acquired over time are labeled with an identifier so I can quickly distinguish individual cards even if they're in a pile of identical cards. Of course I have my name and phone number as well in case I leave the card somewhere.

I recommend that everyone use some sort of identification system for their cards so they can easily disagnose and seperate card-related problems. Find something that works for you; it can be as simple as numbering the cards.

Heck, do it for all your gear. Each of my super clamps, magic arms, umbrellls swivel adapters, etc. all have their own little shorthand ID so I can quickly match them up with an inventory and track any problems with my equipment on a spreadsheet. Broke the handle on "LT#3" on a shoot? No problem; I can make a note that I've substituted something for it and that I need to contact Manfrotto for a replacement handle.

After reading this thread, the next time i have this kind of issue I'm definitely not going to be so casual about sticking a card with problems into another camera to see if it works.

I guess I can't wash my cards with my laundry any more either.
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Nina Zhito, Photographer
Bay Area | CA | | Posted: 1:38 PM on 04.10.12
->> This disturbing notion of a "killer card" was sufficiently alarming to me to interrogate an electronics whiz about the topic at some length. The following generous summary, reproduced with permission, was provided, with the request only that it be attributed to "some electrical engineer". Note for the squeamish: Some unpleasant details about circuitry sausage-making follow:

I read the attack of the killer compact flash card with some interest, since I have a DSLR. My background is in analog integrated circuit (AKA microchip) design.

First some background on the CF card. The compact flash card is a variant of cardbus/PCMCIA slot found on older notebook computers. [Most notebooks these days use Express cards unless you special order a Cardbus slot, or they don't have a card slot at all.] CF just uses less pins than a carbus card, but is quite similar.

Cardbus/PCMCIA/CF cards are hot swappable. This has nothing to do with 1960's sexual practices, but rather means the card can be inserted and removed from a powered device (AKA your camera) without damage. [You can google latch-up to find out what can happen to a product not designed for hot swapping.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Latchup

] To make a product hot swappable, the power pins are connected before any other pins. This is done based on the physical construction of card socket. In reality, you would apply a little electronic protection as well in the form of soft-start circuity and/or current limiting. You can't be too careful when dealing with what in electronics is called the "outside world."

Now for the camera to CF interface. When designing an electronic device, the general mindset is any pin that sees the outside world can be shorted to ground. If you are a bit more conservative, the next criteria is any pin could be shorted to a power supply. In the case of a CF card, the host (i.e. camera) provides the power. You certainly want some current limiting on power supplied to an external component, rather than say something up.

So my claim is a well designed product can take both a short to ground or a power supply indefinitely. To some degree, this come naturally with CMOS integrated circuits. If the CF card shorted every pin to ground, a well designed camera would not be destroyed. It would have current limiting on the power pin. Even if it didn't, the camera would discover in very short order that the device (CF card) is as dead as a rock and disconnect power. For example, when the host (camera) talks to the card, it can sense the logic levels that it is delivering to the pins of the card. If the camera wants to put a logic high level on a pin and it reads that the pin is still low, then the camera knows the pin is shorted to ground and should power down the CF.

I'm not crazy enough to fry a third camera by testing the CF card in it, but I'd chance putting the CF into an external card reader. Note that these reader use USB power, which if done correctly is current limited. I would expect the card not to work in the external reader, but the reader not to blow up.

At this point, you can stop reading, because the text turns into the nitty gritty of sausage making that you probably don't want to know about. But if you have the stomach for this stuff...

The next step in the chain is what happens to your blown up camera. If enough cameras of the same model are being repaired for the same problem, the camera maker's quality assurance group would (hopefully) get involved. The problem would be traced back to the "offending" chip(s). If the manufacturer can't find a reason for their design to be failing, and note their engineers are just wonderful people that don't ever screw up, the fecal matter rolls downhill to the company that produced the chip. Coincidentally, the semiconductor manufacturer has equally wonderful people that don't screw up. Then finger pointing occurs, plus comments about the circumstances of the other person's birth, stopping just short of claiming that yo mamma wears a pocket protector.

The first step at the semiconductor factory is to take the offending chip, tie all the power supply pins to the ground pins, and run a curve tracer on each non-power pin.

Hopefully one newer that this:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Semiconductor_curve_tracer


The curve trace usually shows an open circuit over a certain voltage range, then it detects the protection diodes associate with the pin. If the pin is damaged, it is either open or a short.

The second step at the semiconductor firm is to "jet etch" the malfunctioned chip's plastic package so that it can be inspected visually. There is usually obvious damage at the pin that failed the curve trace test. [You could screw up the jet etch, so that is why the curve trace was done first, since it is relatively safe, and at least you have some diagnostic data on the part should the jet etch go bad.] If the damage is not visible, much like a medical doctor treating a patient, the diagnostic tests get more and more complicated. The suits eventually get involved to determine just how good of a customer are they dealing with, not unlike your medical insurance company determining if you are worthy.

At some point, an agreement is reached as to who screwed up and the design gets fixed. Unless the screw up is causing fires or bodily harm, the crappy design stays on the market and everyone shuts their mouth about the problem. [When Apple macbooks were catching fire, it was hard to tell the customer "they were holding it wrong", hence a battery recall.]

Note that the compact flash manufacturer could do similar diagnostics on their product. If I were Nikon QA, I would have requested the dud CF to better understand the problem.
....

And, rather probably, this is quite more than "nuff said".
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Yamil Sued, Photographer, Photo Editor
Peoria | AZ | USA | Posted: 1:58 PM on 04.10.12
->> Nina, thank you for the informative Post.

This thread keeps getting better and better by the day!!

Joey, send the two bodies and the Offending CF Card to Nikon, that way they can test it and figure out what actually happened to the canard and the bodies. This could help the rest of us in the future.

Was this outside damage, something you did or some sort of design flaw in the card itself??

Thanks again
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Steven Georges, Photographer
Garden Grove | CA | USA | Posted: 5:48 PM on 04.10.12
->> Thank you Nina, I do have two questions if you can ask your friend.

1. I have always made a point to turn my camera off before inserting or removing my camera cards. Does the hot swappable part mean that that is not necessary? (so long as I don't remove the card when something is being written to it)

2. Are the new XQD camera cards used in the Nikon D4 just as vulnerable to this camera damaging problem?
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Nina Zhito, Photographer
Bay Area | CA | | Posted: 4:29 PM on 04.12.12
->> Steven, as to the latter question, my Guru wouldn't be in a position to know, with no involvement in the engineering of the D4. One lamely trusts that bugs will get worked out over time, but as was observed, when blame gets passed and fingers are pointed, it's rather more of a challenge. And then the marketing people get helpfully involved and try to spin a deficit into a product feature somehow. :>

As to question 1) -- that's best practice and a good habit we've all gotten into. The Guru, however, points out: "These days OFF doesn't mean off. Many modern devices pull power from the battery even if switched to the off position. But it is very likely putting the camera in the OFF position does power down the CF slot."

Hope this helps and thanks again to Joey for sharing his unfortunate experience...
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Jack Kurtz, Photographer
Phoenix | AZ | United States | Posted: 9:23 PM on 04.12.12
->> Are these "Killer Cards" only taking out Nikons? I haven't heard about this issue with Canon bodies. If it is only Nikons, is it possible that it's partly a Nikon issue and partly a Killer Card issue?
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Yamil Sued, Photographer, Photo Editor
Peoria | AZ | USA | Posted: 11:08 PM on 04.12.12
->> If there is an internal short in the card, it will take out ANY camera. You can try it if you want ;)

Joey, have you sent your bodies out??

Have you sent your card back to Sandisk?? I'm curious to find out what happened here.

Y
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Michael Chen, Assistant, Photographer
Saratoga | CA | USA | Posted: 7:00 AM on 04.13.12
->> I'm pretty sure that turning your camera's power switch to the "Off" position DOES NOT power down your CF card slot.

Turn your Nikon D-whatever "off". Put a new card in. See that little green light blink on and off on the back of your camera? Also, look at the top LCD; the "-E-" will have changed to the estimated number of shots remaining.

Also, if you shoot off a long burst and then turn your camera off before the camera clears your buffer, it will continue to write to the card until the buffer is clear.

I'm sure this is an indication that the CF card slot(s) still draw power when the camera's switch is in the "Off" position.
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Timothy Andrews, Photographer
Hanahan | SC | USA | Posted: 9:32 AM on 04.13.12
->> Based on what I got out of Nina's post, no, a shorted card won't take out ANY camera. It will only take out a camera that doesn't recognize the faulty card and cut power to it. Therefore, while the fault may lie in the CF card, the true design flaw is in the camera's inability to cope with a faulty card. It's conceivable the reason no one is reporting any Canons suffering the same fate is because the Canons are properly recognizing bad cards.... or Canon user's are really lucky.
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Nina Zhito, Photographer
Bay Area | CA | | Posted: 11:32 AM on 04.13.12
->> Great point Timothy. That's a topic for another thread I guess: "Do Canons ever suffer death by CF cards"? Would be ideal if the card and cameras could be sent together to Nikon engineers, for a full bench analysis of the killer combo. Wonder how often this has happened -- what the failure rate actually is.
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Yamil Sued, Photographer, Photo Editor
Peoria | AZ | USA | Posted: 12:59 PM on 04.13.12
->> But OTOH, If I owned a canon DSLR, I wouldn't want to put Joey's Killer card on my Body!! There is too much risk involved and to prove what??

Better be safe than sorry.
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Nina Zhito, Photographer
Bay Area | CA | | Posted: 5:12 PM on 04.13.12
->> I am relieved, Yamil. Looking at your balls-out Fort Bragg photographs, your warrior spirit is evident. Jack and Timothy have taken the challenge to the next level... but like you, I'd want the engineering equivalent of scary black helicopter guys with lots of training, no-bid contracts, huge budgets and pocket-protectors to swoop in and take over.
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Joey Wilson, Photographer
Savannah | GA | USA | Posted: 10:18 PM on 04.13.12
->> Update....

Both bodies sent to Nikon at Melville.....received on Thursday, but I have not received my email with a case number yet, so the bodies are not in their system yet, so I can't report on anything yet. Card is still on my workstation table. I plan to appeal to Sandisk to see if they can tell me anything. One update, or correction for all of you - the card was not one of my Extreme cards, it was in fact a Sandisk Ultra 4GB card (I have mainly Extreme cards and mistakenly assumed it was one of my Extreme cards).

Now I just have to pray that Melville can get both of these bodies up and running and returned to me by April 30th. I have to leave on May 1st to Shoot a surfing event in North Carolina and I am left with one "well used" D200 body and I'm pretty nervous about it. Anyone had a D300 body out there for sale - I might just have to buy one to shoot this event and then sell it when Nikon returns my two bodies............not a pretty couple of days ahead......

-Joey
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Yamil Sued, Photographer, Photo Editor
Peoria | AZ | USA | Posted: 10:31 PM on 04.13.12
->> Joey,

Glad you got the repairs going. I hope you get them back before April 30th.

If you need a a D300, LMK, a good buddy of mine has one he wants to sell.

Nina, I'm not a warrior, but the heroes I photograph are!! I'm honored to have met some of them and I'm grateful for their sacrifices.

Y
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Joey Wilson, Photographer
Savannah | GA | USA | Posted: 11:21 PM on 04.13.12
->> Yamil...

Thanks...ask your friend to PM me or email me with info....I'm about to get a little desperate. Never thought I'd have this issue with three bodies, but I sure never thought I'd have the "killer card" issue either!!
photographybyjoeywilson@gmail.com

-Joey
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Yamil Sued, Photographer, Photo Editor
Peoria | AZ | USA | Posted: 12:26 AM on 04.14.12
->> Joey,

Done!!

I sent him your info.

I'll call him tomorrow to make sure this happens for you.

Y
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Michael Troutman, Photographer
Carmel | CA | USA | Posted: 3:57 AM on 04.14.12
->> A seriously disturbing (and invaluable) thread. Wow...I had *NO* idea!
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Joey Wilson, Photographer
Savannah | GA | USA | Posted: 2:19 PM on 04.14.12
->> UPDATE:
Both bodies logged in at Melville NY Nikon Service Center - only note so far is B2 Service for both bodies. I asked if they could expedite service so I could have both bodies back in my hand by April 30 - they said they'd do their best (anyone with any pull at Melville or have a contact I can get in touch with would be appreciated).

I'll update you on the progress and more importantly, any explanation Nikon can give me regarding what exactly this "killer card" did to my bodies.

Card yet to be sent to Sandisk - waiting on a reply from customer service.
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Dave Prelosky, Photographer
Lower Burrell | Pa | US | Posted: 3:34 PM on 04.14.12
->> Joey -
If they have the parts on hand, you should be able to relax. But, that's a big if...
This is the situation I described several time above. B2 repair because of dead card plus parts delay on Nikon's end equals more time in the shop than I would deem rational. Knowing someone won't help if Nikon won't slip a $5 part into an overnight bag from the home office with the other stuff they must ship on a regular basis...
Nikon is probably like many companies. I suspect they aren't set up to communicate more than generally about internal activity. You can find your repair on "Parts Hold" which could mean the part is in transit from Japan, is out of stock word wide, hasn't been manufactured yet, or on backorder from their vendor...but you'll never know because the status will just jump to "in shop" and the gear will magically reappear on your doorstep.
If it sounds as if I'm a bit testy about the prospects, it's because I've been held up for weeks and months without explanation on a fairly frequent basis.
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Yamil Sued, Photographer, Photo Editor
Peoria | AZ | USA | Posted: 5:08 PM on 04.14.12
->> Like I said before, I've had several Parts Holds in the past, but thanks to NPS, most of them have been solved by loaners gear from NPS. NPS just went through a big inventory process, they are back in business loaning gear again.

I know Joey is not an NPS member and a delay would be more of a problem for him than for NPS members. But like it happened to me, if they don't have the gear you need, you can't borrow it.

Joey, my buddy Dale will call you soon.

Y
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Nina Zhito, Photographer
Bay Area | CA | | Posted: 11:34 PM on 04.16.12
->> Joey, any reaaon not to Melville the card, too?
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Nina Zhito, Photographer
Bay Area | CA | | Posted: 11:36 PM on 04.16.12
->> Er, sorry, i.e. to *send* Melville the card. Although it might be entertaining to use Melville as a verb. I Melvilled my books at the library and got a huge late fee, etc.
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Joey Wilson, Photographer
Savannah | GA | USA | Posted: 4:03 PM on 04.17.12
->> Nina....

The card is going to Sandisk. I am going to see if they will investigate the issue and give me some sort of explanation as to why their card killed two of my bodies. Heck, I'm even going to include a PDF of my Nikon repair bills and see if they'll help me out with those!!

I, along with many of you that have emailed me, are very curious to hear what Sandisk has to say.....

Dave - I'm feeling lucky. Both of my service orders are "in shop" at the moment and I'm hoping that means Melville is working their little Nikon hands off on both the bodies !! !!
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Joey Wilson, Photographer
Savannah | GA | USA | Posted: 12:27 PM on 04.18.12
->> Not holding my breath on Sandisk helping out with the repairs on my two bodies - but that isn't stopping me from asking them, since it was their card that killed both the bodies.....
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