Story   Photographer   Editor   Student/Intern   Assistant   Job/Item

SportsShooter.com: The Online Resource for Sports Photography

Contents:
 Front Page
 Member Index
 Latest Headlines
 Special Features
 'Fun Pix'
 Message Board
 Educate Yourself
 Equipment Profiles
 Bookshelf
 my.SportsShooter
 Classified Ads
 Workshop
Contests:
 Monthly Clip Contest
 Annual Contest
 Rules/Info
Newsletter:
 Current Issue
 Back Issues
Members:
 Members Area
 "The Guide"
 Join
About Us:
 About SportsShooter
 Contact Us
 Terms & Conditions


Sign in:
Members log in here with your user name and password to access the your admin page and other special features.

Name:



Password:







||
SportsShooter.com: Member Message Board

My Future
Robby Gallagher, Photographer, Student/Intern
Brookings | SD | USA | Posted: 9:49 PM on 10.26.10
->> I keep my eye on the NPPA website for job openings and all sorts of stuff like that, but I have run into a small issue. Every paper or company that posts an opening, say that the position is not an entry level position.

Is there such this as an entry level position? I am looking to graduate in December and I am recently married. I am going to be needing a job or paying internship... Do any of you have any suggestions for me (other than saying "Give up")? I would really appreciate your opinions. Thanks!
 This post is:  Informative (0) | Funny (0) | Huh? (0) | Off Topic (0) | Inappropriate (0) |   Definitions

Andrew Nelles, Photographer
Chicago | IL | usa | Posted: 9:56 PM on 10.26.10
->> Internships. Apply for as many as you can and be prepared to travel for one.
 This post is:  Informative (2) | Funny (0) | Huh? (0) | Off Topic (0) | Inappropriate (0) |   Definitions

Robby Gallagher, Photographer, Student/Intern
Brookings | SD | USA | Posted: 10:19 PM on 10.26.10
->> I have applied for every internships I have heard and read about
 This post is:  Informative (0) | Funny (0) | Huh? (0) | Off Topic (0) | Inappropriate (0) |   Definitions

Jeremy Harmon, Photo Editor, Photographer
Salt Lake City | UT | USA | Posted: 10:37 PM on 10.26.10
->> Andrew's right.

Internships are the way to go. With the state of the business, it's harder and harder all the time to get an internship, but it's what you need. Realistically, most people have three internships under their belt before they are considered experienced enough for a full time position, even at a smaller daily.

One of the troubles you're going to have is a lot of papers have had to discontinue their internship programs because of decreased budgets. There just aren't as many options out there as there once were.

Looking at the news portfolio you have on your website, it isn't very likely that you will get an entry level job somewhere when you graduate. You just don't have the chops yet. I'm not saying that to be rude. You need to really step it up to get a staff job somewhere. If you're graduating in a few months the only real way you'll be able to do this is to get a few internships under your belt but keep in mind, you'll be competing with students from all over the country for the same internship.

I'm not saying this to discourage you. Quite the opposite really. Right now you need to work harder if you want to get a newspaper job because you really aren't there yet.
 This post is:  Informative (6) | Funny (0) | Huh? (0) | Off Topic (0) | Inappropriate (0) |   Definitions

Robert Scheer, Photographer
Indianapolis | IN | USA | Posted: 10:49 PM on 10.26.10
->> Robby,

For some, it's not an easy road. My tale is not unusual at all, but it might give you some perspective. I did not go to a PJ school, and never had a proper "internship." Briefly:

In college, I made a nice portrait of the new editor at the local weekly paper. I got along well with her, and right after I graduated, I was offered a stringer position. $5 per published photo (in 1994). I split the news hole with another photographer and shot everything I could, plus did a weekly photo page, and made $40-$60 a week. Lots of baked potatoes and Top Ramen, for a year.

Then, I worked at a tiny daily for another year. I had to wear slacks, dress shoes and a tie each day, on a $6.50/hour wage, no insurance or vacation or overtime. Yes, it was criminal, as I worked 70-80+ hour weeks.

Afterwards, I put in an additional three years at a small chain of weeklies, for a little bit more ($12 an hour), prior to getting hired at my current paper, The Indianapolis Star.

I've met lots of newspaper photographers who have had similar tales. One of my colleagues has no degree and was a janitor at my paper before deciding to build up his portfolio over five+ years, then finally got a temporary job, which turned permanent. He's absolutely one of the best photographers I've ever worked with.

Do kick-arse work, be cool, shake (lots) of hands, be prepared to suffer for a while, and you will succeed.
 This post is:  Informative (2) | Funny (0) | Huh? (0) | Off Topic (0) | Inappropriate (0) |   Definitions

Patrick Fallon, Student/Intern, Photographer
Columbia | MO | USA | Posted: 10:57 PM on 10.26.10
->> Find a good mentor, one who will give you honest and constructive advice, it will help you more in the long run than anything else. NPPA has a mentor connection program for student members. I would be happy to give some suggestions. Shoot me an email.

- Patrick
http://www.patrickfallonphoto.com/blog/
Board of Directors Student Representative, NPPA
 This post is:  Informative (0) | Funny (0) | Huh? (0) | Off Topic (0) | Inappropriate (0) |   Definitions

Eugene P. Tanner, Photographer, Photo Editor
Honolulu | HI | USA | Posted: 11:22 PM on 10.26.10
->> Hey Robby,

Patrick Fallon has some great advice... Find a good mentor. I have been working in the news business for over 20 years and I still have two mentors I talk to for advice... Finding a paid internship will be tough but don't turn down an unpaid internship if it comes your way. I did three paid internships and one unpaid internship when I started out in the news business. The unpaid internship pretty much was the best internship I had... The experience I gained from it was priceless... Many newspapers don't advertise their internships on the NPPA Job Bank. Search the newspapers on the internet, contact the Photo Editors or Director of Photography and see what they have to offer... Don't concentrate your search on the large markets. Try searching the medium to small markets. You might have better luck in finding your internship...

Best of Luck!

Eugene...
 This post is:  Informative (0) | Funny (0) | Huh? (0) | Off Topic (0) | Inappropriate (0) |   Definitions

Chuck Liddy, Photographer
Durham | NC | USA | Posted: 11:30 PM on 10.26.10
->> Robbie, this is all very good advice but I'm going to have to jump in and say something. I've read many of your postings and looked at your images the past year or so. I hate to be blunt and honest but I really, really hope you have a plan "b" or plan "c". there are a LOT, check that, there are an ENORMOUS amount of talented photographers out in the job market. Not just the staffers who have been laid off but there are perhaps hundreds (?) of PJ students from the last several years who are still in the game or want to be in the game. I'm afraid your instructors are still leading you down a path if they are telling you "wide eyed innocence" and a "by golly I can do this" attitude will land you a job. it won't. I understand my esteemed colleague mr. scheer was saying to you in his above post but I have to tell you this is not 1994. sixteen years ago you could still get into this field through that kind of "nose to the grindstone" attitude...I went that same path in 1974 and it worked....but this is 2010. you might need to be realistic....this just might not be the field you need to be in.
 This post is:  Informative (21) | Funny (0) | Huh? (0) | Off Topic (0) | Inappropriate (1) |   Definitions

Robby Gallagher, Photographer, Student/Intern
Brookings | SD | USA | Posted: 11:50 PM on 10.26.10
->> Chuck- You are right. It is quite obvious that I do not need to be in this field. However, it is where I want to be. So I am going to work at it, get myself some more mentors, and practice. No one has told me that I just have to have the right attitude. I have been told over and over that I need to work hard for what I want. I am going to do that. I do have a plan B. I am receiving a degree in Media Production in December. I am not a Photojournalism student. If things don't work out in my favor, that is life, but it doesn't mean that I am not going to try.
 This post is:  Informative (0) | Funny (0) | Huh? (0) | Off Topic (0) | Inappropriate (0) |   Definitions

Michael McNamara, Photographer, Photo Editor
Phoenix | AZ | USA | Posted: 11:57 PM on 10.26.10
->> Robby, one thing you need to seriously work on is your spelling and grammar. When you apply for internships and jobs, the ability to write clear, concise and correct captions counts as much as your pictures. Sometimes more. If you have grammatical mistakes in things like your cover letter or résumé, an editor is going to be suspicious of your ability to get captions correct as well. And that means they will hire somebody else. An editor will be willing to work with a young photographer to hone their craft....they will not be willing to babysit somebody who might force the paper to run a bunch of corrections.

I'm not saying that you have mistakes in your cover letter, résumé or captions, but your history of posts on this site make it a point worth bringing up.
 This post is:  Informative (4) | Funny (0) | Huh? (0) | Off Topic (0) | Inappropriate (0) |   Definitions

Robby Gallagher, Photographer, Student/Intern
Brookings | SD | USA | Posted: 12:03 AM on 10.27.10
->> Thanks for the advice everyone. I will work on my past mistakes. Thanks again!
 This post is:  Informative (0) | Funny (0) | Huh? (0) | Off Topic (0) | Inappropriate (0) |   Definitions

Thomas E. Witte, Photographer, Photo Editor
Cincinnati | OH | USA | Posted: 12:55 AM on 10.27.10
->> Whoever tagged Chuck's post as inappropriate needs to be hit in the temple with a baseball bat. It's the reality of the situation (not Robby's but everyone's), so you need to either take your fingers out of your ears and your hands from your eyes or face the risk of filling for bankruptcy in three years.
 This post is:  Informative (14) | Funny (0) | Huh? (0) | Off Topic (0) | Inappropriate (0) |   Definitions

Thomas E. Witte, Photographer, Photo Editor
Cincinnati | OH | USA | Posted: 12:57 AM on 10.27.10
->> Of course it loses all impact when I misspell filing.
 This post is:  Informative (0) | Funny (10) | Huh? (0) | Off Topic (0) | Inappropriate (0) |   Definitions

Bryan Kaisk, Photographer
Copley | OH | United States | Posted: 10:08 AM on 10.27.10
->> If this is what you want to do for a living Robby then work your butt off to get there. But everyone here is right...have a backup plan in case it doesn't work out. Even better, take that Media Production degree and work that full time and continue to refine your skills as a photographer. Believe me, I'm by no means at the level of a majority of these fine photographers here, but it's what I'm passionate about and I won't let anything stand in my way of being successful. Take the constructive criticism and run with it. You will get frustrated and battered many times along the way, but it's a cut-throat industry and it's part of the job. Think about shooting under someone to gain experience, go to workshops, and get advice here. The wonderful thing about photography is that there's always something to learn. Great photographer's are a dime a dozen nowadays, and the only way to differentiate yourself from the rest is to be unique in your shooting style. Chuck's post isn't inappropriate...he's just saying what everyone else is thinking. Respect the comments you receive here, and better yourself from them.
 This post is:  Informative (2) | Funny (0) | Huh? (0) | Off Topic (0) | Inappropriate (0) |   Definitions

Jeremy Harmon, Photo Editor, Photographer
Salt Lake City | UT | USA | Posted: 12:01 PM on 10.27.10
->> I am also surprised somebody would mark Chuck's post inappropriate. How is it inappropriate?

We all know the state of the business right now. Look at the NPPA job bank or journalismjobs.com. Correct me if I'm wrong but I don't think The Super Happy Make All My Dreams Come True Candy Land Gazette is hiring.

Chuck's comments are spot on.
 This post is:  Informative (1) | Funny (2) | Huh? (0) | Off Topic (0) | Inappropriate (0) |   Definitions

Matthew Sauk, Photographer
Sandy | UT | United States | Posted: 12:09 PM on 10.27.10
->> "Nothing in this world can take the place of persistence. Talent will not; nothing is more common than unsuccessful people with talent. Genius will not; unrewarded genius is almost a proverb. Education will not; the world is full of educated derelicts. Persistence and determination alone are omnipotent."

Calvin Coolidge
 This post is:  Informative (1) | Funny (0) | Huh? (0) | Off Topic (0) | Inappropriate (0) |   Definitions

G.J. McCarthy, Photographer
Dallas | TX | US | Posted: 12:16 PM on 10.27.10
->> " ... I don't think The Super Happy Make All My Dreams Come True Candy Land Gazette is hiring."

Holy shit that would be the greatest job ever. Now where did I put my old resume ...
 This post is:  Informative (0) | Funny (4) | Huh? (0) | Off Topic (0) | Inappropriate (0) |   Definitions

Les Stukenberg, Photographer, Photo Editor
Prescott Valley | AZ | USA | Posted: 12:21 PM on 10.27.10
->> Robby,
You have gotten some great advice here. Somewhat like Robert and Chuck I came up the route of US Navy photog, out of the biz for 10 years, then back in as a stringer for $5 a published photo, then was offered a staff job, then moved onto a larger paper, and up at that paper. I think it can still be done but you have to know what you want. It just may take joining a small daily daily or weekly as a stringer and working your butt off.
You have to offer skills that others don't have or have not perfected.. Obviously having a great eye and standout images is the first step and might get you in the door. Another is knowing how to shoot and edit video as being multi-talented adds to your value to a newspaper.
As a side note when i left the Navy I listened to the naysayers and didn't pursue a photo career. Ten years later I still had that hunger and didn't listen to those voices and I made it work. Yes things have changed but find out for yourself and then you'll never wonder "what if."
 This post is:  Informative (0) | Funny (0) | Huh? (0) | Off Topic (0) | Inappropriate (0) |   Definitions

Jon Gardiner, Photographer
Durham | NC | USA | Posted: 12:38 PM on 10.27.10
->> Robby,

Just so you know, you are reaping the REWARDS of being on this site and posing a question like this. The responses you are getting are from those who would be speakers at a photojournalism conference. Developing a sense of where you are in skill, understanding and goals is priceless in knowing what to do from here on. GET A THICK SKIN and take every criticism as a challenge.

-J
 This post is:  Informative (3) | Funny (0) | Huh? (1) | Off Topic (0) | Inappropriate (0) |   Definitions

Eric Canha, Photographer
Brockton | MA | United States | Posted: 1:39 PM on 10.27.10
->> To steal the words of a friend and fellow member...

You could simply start your own publication.

The pay will suck (at first), the hours will be just as long (if not longer), the boss will be just as brutally honest (if you're going to make it) and 2 out of 7 nights you'll go to bed feeling like a total failure (who can't get fired). In the end you may just find that it was every bit as rewarding.
 This post is:  Informative (2) | Funny (0) | Huh? (1) | Off Topic (0) | Inappropriate (0) |   Definitions

Nic Coury, Photographer
Monterey | CA | | Posted: 1:44 PM on 10.27.10
->> I'm 26 and at my first staff job at a Weekly in California in my hometown.

I got out of college with a B.S. in journalism and thought I was ready. After a year of no responses to any job whatsoever and slinging espresso (which I did enjoy and still do), I applied for an internship and learned that I wasn't ready whatsoever for the cutthroat world of the journalism market.

What I've learned so far (probably a bunch of points I am forgetting...):

It is not a normal 9-5 job and don't treat it like one at first. I work long hours and I work extremely hard to make good photos. It's a very hard business to be in.

No one is going to give you sympathy, so as others have said, learn to take criticism. Befriend people in the industry and soak up all you can from other photogs and be respectful of your work and their work.

As much as I hate to admit it, my folks were right about this point: The worst someone can say is "no". Don't be afraid to try new things either. If you're looking at well-known photos work, it's different and new and interesting. Why do something someone else has already done, unless you can do it in a new and interesting way.

Lastly, and this is important to me, enjoy your work. Make time for personal projects and fun shoots, even if just for yourself. It helps your job work and provides a place to be in control.

~ nic
 This post is:  Informative (3) | Funny (0) | Huh? (0) | Off Topic (0) | Inappropriate (0) |   Definitions

Matthew Hinton, Photographer, Assistant
New Orleans | LA | USA | Posted: 2:08 PM on 10.27.10
->> Looking at your sportsshooter page your first link to your portfolio sends you to smugmug. The second link takes you to the school paper and again it's not really possible to find your work there. So if I was an editor I'd totally forget about you after that first click.

Also your portfolio that is finally in the third link shows little if any journalism. You need to make a site that is for journalism so again and editor doesn't have to click through a bunch of garbage to see what he wants see to hire you for a journalism job.

You're making it really hard to hire you just by going by your sportsshooter page and links.

And just sports action on your sportsshooter page is not going to get your hired either unless those images show creativity, initiative, variety, and or intimacy with the subject which they don't.

They look like you went a game and got some sharp pictures. Each picture tells me the same thing: you can go to a game and get sharp pictures. That's all the say. Just about everyone applying for an internship / job can get that. You need to show more about what you can do in each image and set yourself apart.
 This post is:  Informative (3) | Funny (0) | Huh? (0) | Off Topic (0) | Inappropriate (0) |   Definitions

George Bridges, Photographer, Photo Editor
Washington | DC | USA | Posted: 2:21 PM on 10.27.10
->> Not getting personal to anyone in particular here but many have stated what is fact:

Journalism staff jobs are contracting and getting smaller every day.

There are "entry level" openings out there but for those you are getting guys with lots of experience trying for them as well as their staff job has gone away.

These entry-level positions are not what they used to be. When journalism was booming, or at least steady, you took an entry-level job and got some tutelage from a crusty veteran and worked your way up until you hit the level or town you were happy in and then settled down and started mentoring younger shooters.

For a long time now photography jobs have been extremely tight and publications have received an overabundance of applications.

True story, about a decade ago a friend went to interview at another paper. Only a few people knew beforehand he was going. Before he got back from the trip his current employer had received three applications. Seriously. No job had been offered or accepted at the new paper and no job had been posted at the old one, but people were applying simply on the rumor someone went to interview elsewhere.

If you want to work in this industry expect to battle for every position you apply for. Expect to spend time as a freelancer working like mad getting your name out there and getting your work up to par with others who are applying against you at the few staff jobs that come open.
 This post is:  Informative (2) | Funny (0) | Huh? (0) | Off Topic (0) | Inappropriate (0) |   Definitions

Debra L Rothenberg, Photographer
New York | NY | USA | Posted: 2:35 PM on 10.27.10
->> I just have to chime in here because there is so much written to Robby to discourage him. For every SUPER talented staffer somewhere, there is also another staffer elsewhere that MANY will look at and wonder 'How in the world did this person get THAT staff job???"
I have said this before and will say it again-as a student at RIT, I was told almost monthly "you suck, you're never going to make it, find a new career." They weren't lying-(but I didn't need to hear it all the thru my years there) but I had what many didn't-the drive, the energy, the desire. I never interned. Believe it or not, I was never told about that while a student. For my first staff job, I cold wrote to every paper in every state I wanted to be in.I had 189 rejection letters. I had interviews at a few, and was asked often why I cold wrote them. My response was the same-I want to work. I ended up getting a job in a small town in a state I didn't want to be in for a small paper with a brilliant photographer above me. I remember when I asked him why he hired me, he said you were willing to move far away from your home, to a town you know nothing about and don't know anyone. You were driven and hungry and I knew you would work hard and learn. 3 months later, I won a National First place award from NPPA. I did some ok work, a lot of crappy work, and I worked my tail off. It WAS my internship, even though it was a staff job. My second and third staff jobs were the same, only slightly larger papers.
Before this job, I interviewed at another paper and I didn't get the job-I just didn't have the experience they wanted but the editor obviously liked me because years later, he came calling with an offer.
I moved to NYC 11 years ago knowing no one-personally or professionally. I was 37, had some ok images but compared to many here, I still was a lousy photographer, and was starting out all over again. I pounded the pavement, got a staff job at a college and left that 9 months later and went freelance. For almost a decade, I have been shooting more than my widest dreams would ever have imagined. One of my public relation clients has turned into a good friend and I emailed asking him why he comes to me first with all his shoots. His response was what I have heard before "you are so easy to work with and all my clients love you. They tell me there are a lot of nasty know-it-all photographers and they don't like working with them, no matter how good they may be".
IF I listened to all those along the way who told me I would never make it, how bad I was, etc, I'd be dead. I knew they were being honest-but nothing was going to stop me. There was nothing else I wanted to do, nothing else I could do. I was willing to move anywhere-well, almost-I didn't want that staff job on Guam right out of college.
The advice from everyone here is realistic, it MAY be true, but Robby, you may just be that one kid like I was who makes it. I didn't have a plan b or c...even when I moved here (with only $13k to my name, which is about 4 moths living in NYC).
The quote Matthew posted is true-at least for me..and it can be for you too
> "Nothing in this world can take the place of persistence. Talent will not; nothing is more common than unsuccessful people with talent. Genius will not; unrewarded genius is almost a proverb. Education will not; the world is full of educated derelicts. Persistence and determination alone are omnipotent."

Calvin Coolidge

DLR
 This post is:  Informative (8) | Funny (0) | Huh? (0) | Off Topic (0) | Inappropriate (0) |   Definitions

George Bridges, Photographer, Photo Editor
Washington | DC | USA | Posted: 2:50 PM on 10.27.10
->> Debra,

189 rejection letters? Now that is a lesson in keeping the fight alive.

There are jobs out there, they are just more competitive than ever in our industry and the odds are longer, but can be overcome.
 This post is:  Informative (1) | Funny (0) | Huh? (0) | Off Topic (0) | Inappropriate (0) |   Definitions

Matt Miller, Photographer
Omaha | NE | USA | Posted: 2:50 PM on 10.27.10
->> robby, your work has improved since i first looked at it last year, but most of the advice is still applicable.

fill the frame.

shoot more sports that are "easier" to photograph. for example, track and field is outdoors and allows you to use shorter lenses to get better shots.

diversify your portfolio. sports photographers are really a dime a dozen because folks that make lots of money in other professions can buy nicer gear than you and make some pretty nice images. lighting skills and audio/video skills are a good way to step away from the crowd.

also, we have had some really good seminars down here in omaha. our presenters, the world-herald and journal-star editors do portfolio critiques, as well as many local shooters and the associated press photographer here. i don't think you have ever made it down. it's good to meet people face to face, if you can. it also helps separate you from the rest.

lastly, when we e-mailed in february, i suggested you broaden your internship search from the northern plains to the entire country.

the advice everyone else offered is good, as well.
i think chuck is spot-on.

good luck, robby.
 This post is:  Informative (1) | Funny (0) | Huh? (0) | Off Topic (0) | Inappropriate (0) |   Definitions

Jennifer Cappuccio Maher, Photographer
Ontario | California | usa | Posted: 3:11 PM on 10.27.10
->> I second internships as well, but you also need to freelance. Freelance for any local paper that will use you and start NOW! When I started out, I freelanced for any paper in my area (which was about a 70 mile radius) that would call me, which became about 5 papers, and I did it, while in college, for 2.5 years before I got my first full-time job.

Contacts are also very important. Freelancing is a great way to build your skills and your portfolio, as well as getting yourself into the newsroom, which will get you in front of the photo editor and when a job opens up, you could have the upperhand, IF you have a GREAT working relationship with said editor.
 This post is:  Informative (0) | Funny (0) | Huh? (0) | Off Topic (0) | Inappropriate (0) |   Definitions

Nic Coury, Photographer
Monterey | CA | | Posted: 4:08 PM on 10.27.10
->> Another piece of advice I was thinking over lunch is about non-newspaper work.

Find out about the market where you are and what other photogs are doing and how you can do it better or different. Not so much niche shooting, but understand that if a bunch of GWC's are shooting weddings or it's an over-saturated market, you're not going to be overly successful in it.

For example, in my area, not a lot of shooters are doing commercial video for web stuff. Clients are having to go out of town for it, if they're interested.

Gotta expand your photographic horizons and learn new aspects of how industries change in order to have success.
 This post is:  Informative (0) | Funny (0) | Huh? (0) | Off Topic (0) | Inappropriate (0) |   Definitions

Micah Escamilla, Photographer
Calimesa | CA | United States | Posted: 4:15 PM on 10.27.10
->> hey robby, thanks for posting the question. i just completed my first year of photoj work (as a freelancer) and much of the advice offered to you here has also been given to me during my short time in the industry. it's always helpful to hear it again. heeding the wisdom of others really pays off. i don't comment much in these forums, but i read through them almost daily and always learn something. i'm really grateful for the community here, even if i only chime in once in a while.

the only thing i haven't seen suggested here (unless i missed it) is workshops. i can't stress enough how important and encouraging they have been to me, and i know they've been helpful to the friends/fellow photographers i've known to attend. not only do you get to work and learn alongside some of the best in the trade, but you also get to meet a lot of other motivated photographers who are often in the same position as you. building that network is not only important, but it's really fun! i have had a blast at each workshop i've attended and i can't wait to get into my next one.

i've attended truth with a camera's workshop in ecuador, and a farah nosh workshop in canada. sportshooter has one, which i haven't attended (yet hehe). nppa has some. there's eddie adams, and many more that aren't coming to mind at the moment.

subscribe to some blogs, too, because you'll find a lot of info in them. a photo editor. a photo a day. luceo images. shooting from the hip. thomas boyd's blog, mike davis' blog, etc. lots of great stuff out there.

best of luck with everything and feel free to message me if you have any questions or want to vent about how you still haven't landed a gig. i'm always happy to meet fellow beginners :)
 This post is:  Informative (0) | Funny (0) | Huh? (0) | Off Topic (0) | Inappropriate (0) |   Definitions

Jim Comeau, Photo Editor, Photographer
Los Angeles | CA | USA | Posted: 4:23 PM on 10.27.10
->> How are you applying? Are you submitting through their "Apply Here" links on their company site or are you getting referrals from their staffers you see week after week at events.

I'm usually a by the book kind of person: apply and they'll call me if they want to interview me.

I've found out it is a googol times easier (yes, the number, not the company) to get an interview/job if someone within the company or who works with the company refers you. I have countless examples of applying for jobs within a company and getting zero response despite having all the experience and/or credentials required. However, any job where an employee refers me, I at least get a phone call or interview. I've even been interviewed when they had no vacancies and were trying to make a spot for me.

Most decent sized companies get 100-200 applications per position. They need ways of distinguishing the good from the bad. Be remarkable. Do something different. Be who you want to be, not who you *think* they want you to be. Wow them however you think it will work. Show them what they've never seen before. They think they've seen it all until they see it in your portfolio. That's how people get calls.

Best of luck and keep working toward your dream.
 This post is:  Informative (0) | Funny (0) | Huh? (0) | Off Topic (0) | Inappropriate (0) |   Definitions

Nick Adams, Photographer
Houston | TX | | Posted: 4:24 PM on 10.27.10
->> Roswell Daily Record was hiring a photographer - pay was 10hr. Which is below any entry level job.

I second what everyone said. Even if you want a internship you need to shoot features and news, not only sports.
 This post is:  Informative (0) | Funny (0) | Huh? (0) | Off Topic (0) | Inappropriate (0) |   Definitions

Jeremy Harmon, Photo Editor, Photographer
Salt Lake City | UT | USA | Posted: 5:28 PM on 10.27.10
->> "I just have to chime in here because there is so much written to Robby to discourage him."

Show me one discouraging comment. A person could paraphrase this whole thread by saying, "If you want a staff job at a paper you need to work for it because you're not there yet. Here's how you do it. By the way, it is wise to have a back up plan. p.s. The pay sucks."

Let's show Robby some respect and answer his question with something more than a locker room pep talk. Stories about how it happened for somebody back in the day are all fine and good, but even those stories can be paraphrased like this: "If you want a staff job at a paper you need to work for it because you're not there yet. Here's how you do it. By the way, it is wise to have a back up plan. p.s. The pay sucks."
 This post is:  Informative (1) | Funny (0) | Huh? (1) | Off Topic (0) | Inappropriate (0) |   Definitions

Mark Peters, Photographer
Highland | IL | USA | Posted: 6:09 PM on 10.27.10
->> All of the armed forces have slots for photographers. It certainly requires a different type of commitment than other employers but if you are dead set on this as a profession you should consider all opportunities.
 This post is:  Informative (2) | Funny (0) | Huh? (0) | Off Topic (0) | Inappropriate (0) |   Definitions

Robby Gallagher, Photographer, Student/Intern
Brookings | SD | USA | Posted: 7:12 PM on 10.27.10
->> Once again, I want to thank everyone for their comments. Truthfully, none of this should be marked inappropriate because it is exactly what I asked for. I wanted to know what I needed to do to better my self as a photographer. I am constantly in the process of bettering myself. So thank you for your time and comments. I really appreciate it.
 This post is:  Informative (0) | Funny (0) | Huh? (0) | Off Topic (0) | Inappropriate (0) |   Definitions

T.J. Hamilton, Photographer
Grand Rapids | MI | USA | Posted: 9:26 AM on 10.28.10
->> 30 Years ago when I was in college Nat'l Geographic's Bob Gilka came to speak at our PJ Class. I was a Junior and had the privilege of getting his review of my portfolio. I thought I had a good start to my career having 2 internships under my belt and was proud of what I had to show him. He told me to give up and find something else to do, or ramp it up.
I took that as a kick in the pants and worked even harder to prove him wrong. I went on to do 2 more internships and after graduation, I managed to get a pretty low paying job for a local magazine as their 'cover shooting' photographer, and shot parties and local business portraits.
I was just above minimum wage at the time, but I also knew that I was learning lighting and how to be creative, and making lots of contacts in the area.
Eventually I got on staff at the newspaper, but even then I felt that I couldn't take anything for granted.
Work hard, do internships, and always learn from others. You will make it if you stick with it.
Good luck.
 This post is:  Informative (1) | Funny (0) | Huh? (0) | Off Topic (0) | Inappropriate (0) |   Definitions

Chris Pietsch, Photographer
Eugene | OR | USA | Posted: 11:59 AM on 10.28.10
->> I have to say, after looking at the website linked from your member page, that the presence of just a single photo under "news" (a photo from 2008 at that) is a red flag.

If you have been applying for jobs, I assume you have a more diverse portfolio than sports images. If so, I suggest you make fleshing out other categories like "news" and "features" a high priority.
 This post is:  Informative (1) | Funny (0) | Huh? (0) | Off Topic (0) | Inappropriate (0) |   Definitions

Robby Gallagher, Photographer, Student/Intern
Brookings | SD | USA | Posted: 12:08 PM on 10.28.10
->> That is what I am working on. I was told the majority of my photos were cliche so I trashed them. I am working on my news/feature portfolio this week and next week. Then you can check back and tell me what you think. Thanks
 This post is:  Informative (0) | Funny (0) | Huh? (0) | Off Topic (0) | Inappropriate (0) |   Definitions

Add your comments...
If you'd like to add your comments to this thread, use this form. You need to be an active (paying) member of SportsShooter.com in order to post messages to the system.

NOTE: If you would like to report a problem you've found within the SportsShooter.com website, please let us know via the 'Contact Us' form, which alerts us immediately. It is not guaranteed that a member of the staff will see your message board post.
Thread Title: My Future
Thread Started By: Robby Gallagher
Message:
Member Login:
Password:




Return to -->
Message Board Main Index
What happened when Tony Gonzalez met Mickey Pfleger? Crazy stuff! ::..