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SportsShooter.com: Member Message Board

OT-Mars images
Phil Hawkins, Photographer
Fresno | ca | usa | Posted: 12:50 PM on 06.03.08
->> The Phoenix Mars Lander website has about a gazillion images on it... pretty interesting...

Does anyone know the technical specs on the Mars Orbiter imager? I saw a documentary on it not long ago and all they say is that it's "high resolution"... But in looking at the "lens" shade, the thing must be around 10,000 mm at f/1 or something... I'm scared to ask about sensor specs... must be off the scale.

I just didn't know if anyone has heard any specific numbers on the "camera"
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Thomas Boydston, Photographer, Student/Intern
Conroe | Tx | United States | Posted: 1:18 PM on 06.03.08
->> http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/mgs/sci/details/moctext.html

I believe that is what you are looking for.

The Mars Orbiter is a bit old having lost contact with Earth in '06, but there it is!

The "fish eye" lens was cool to me.

The main homepage of the MOC (Mars Orbiter Camera):
http://www.msss.com/
The homepage of the MOC we care about:
http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/mgs/sci/moc/moc.html

Bests,
Thomas
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Aaron Rhoads, Photographer
McComb | MS | USA | Posted: 2:30 PM on 06.03.08
->> Thomas,

Is your icon image one taken by the Phoenix Mars Lander?

If so wow!8)
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Phil Hawkins, Photographer
Fresno | ca | usa | Posted: 3:17 PM on 06.03.08
->> I stand corrected. I was referring to The Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, which is the "new" or current one. http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/mro/

And in looking at the specs of the Mars Orbiter, I'm seeing a "m/pixel" reference... meaning, I assume, "meters per pixel" (that can't be right)?? or is this NASA-speak for "megapixel"?

Can't seem to find the camera specs for the MRO on it's website.

This stuff is just fascinating to me! I hope I live to witness what I believe will be absolute proof of either life currently on Mars, or existed in the past. And where can I get a camera like that!!
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Sandy Huffaker, Photographer
San Diego | CA | USA | Posted: 3:26 PM on 06.03.08
->> Hmmm! Reminds me of the drive from Yuma to Phoenix. Miles upon miles of nothing but rocks. Who needs to travel that far to see red dirt?
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Max Gersh, Student/Intern, Photo Editor
St. Louis | MO | USA | Posted: 4:03 PM on 06.03.08
->> The Mars Orbiter's telephoto lens is 3500mm f/10. I would expect more out of NASA. I hope the new one has specs more like what Phil guessed.
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Alan Look, Photographer
Bloomington | IL | United States | Posted: 4:27 PM on 06.03.08
->> Sandy, are you trying to start a conspiracy theory? :)
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Thomas Boydston, Photographer, Student/Intern
Conroe | Tx | United States | Posted: 4:29 PM on 06.03.08
->> Yes Max, I too need to be able to see red dirt at a microscopic level. :D

Aaron, unfortunately the Phoenix Mars Lander doesn't specialize in CTO balancing. My photo came from the Hubble.

Phil, the Reconnaissance actually has three cameras. Wikipedia is priceless:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mars_Reconnaissance_Orbiter#HiRISE_.28camera.2...

The focal length for these cameras is different than our 35mm toys. A lot of the lenses are mirror/reflecting and not refracting. Remember those old 1100mm f/11s from the 1980s? Same technology just done better. It gives better angular resolution (being able to tell two distant objects apart) and overall clarity than refracting telescopes for the size. A refracting telescope is HUGE, requires way more precision and just doesn't get the job done when flying through space.

"The High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment camera is a 0.5 m reflecting telescope, the largest ever carried on a deep space mission, and has a resolution of 1 microradian (μrad)"

Also, many space photos are taken with various colour filters, so it seems that this camera's megapixel amount changes between visible colour. At red it measures at 800MP and for BG it's 160MP. You're probably better off just reading the article than suffering my intro-Astronomy attempt at an explanation.

It also houses three other cameras (2 spectrometers and 1 radar) which is quite interesting too. Always good to read up on the other types of light!
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Tim Morley, Photographer
Topinabee | MI | United States | Posted: 10:01 PM on 06.03.08
->> My big question is what the photographs' exposures are. Is the sunlight so dim that these images we are seeing from Mars shot at 3200 ISO or above? If we were there with our Nikon D3's and Canon 1d Mark III's, what would we be setting our exposures to? How light or how dark is it? When my 14 year old son reaches his life dream and becomes the first man on Mars, is he going to need more than just ambient light?
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Thomas Boydston, Photographer, Student/Intern
Conroe | Tx | United States | Posted: 11:04 PM on 06.03.08
->> The "visual geometric albedo," or how much light reaches the planet for Mars: 0.15 and for Earth: 0.367. So the ratio would be 0.409.

Another site says that Mars sees 43% as Earth. So it might vary as Mars has a more elpitical orbit than Earth.

So, if we're at f/8, 160th of a second and ISO200 during typical daylight, during the day on Mars we'd be at a spot around f/5.6, ISO 320 and 160th of a second? Somewhere around there. These are just my guesses though based off some article searching.
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Thomas Boydston, Photographer, Student/Intern
Conroe | Tx | United States | Posted: 11:07 PM on 06.03.08
->> Sorry, I don't think my last guess takes atmosphere into account. Mars has less than 1% Earth's atmosphere as I recall, but with huge dust storms and seasons twice as long as ours (but at a similar ratio) due to its orbit and tilt.
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Aaron Rhoads, Photographer
McComb | MS | USA | Posted: 11:58 PM on 06.03.08
->> Nothing on Mars is moving, so the Phoenix can hand hold the camera.

But, if I remember right, a Mr. Young here in my town told me(he worked with NASA during Apollo missions, as a camera tech) that the motion of the spacecraft, planet, are taken in account when they take pictures from that far away from the sun.
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Thread Title: OT-Mars images
Thread Started By: Phil Hawkins
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