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SportsShooter.com: Member Message Board

Cropping & Boxing
Scott Foster, Photographer
Navarre | Fl | USA | Posted: 7:32 PM on 06.02.07
->> Was wondering how tight is "too tight" in terms of boxing. I know the custom is to crop out legs & get as tight into the action as possible, but how often do you include other things ringside that lend to the event [turnbuckles/lit backgrounds/time clocks]?

Shot the Pavlik/Miranda bout & walked away with the shot I was looking for [hooker-cut on member page] but the published product is cropped much tighter than I had anticipated [removed a turnbuckle that I thought fit the scene].

The crop in "Free-Lunch" is one that I would probably admit is too loose, but I wanted to utilize the clock in the background; comments/criticism welcomed.
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Duane Burleson, Photographer
Sterling Heights | MI | USA | Posted: 10:14 PM on 06.02.07
->> Scott,

I don't see {turnbuckles/lit backgrounds/time clocks]as lending anything to the event in these images. I would crop much tighter than you have. On "hooker-cut" I would crop to just the boxers, getting rid of the distracting Coors sign, crop out the light behind the boxers and the wasted space at the left and make it more horizontal, coming up on the bottom to just leaving the right boxers belt area. "Free-Lunch" doesn't show me much, I would not have used it, "Hung-Out to Dry" is a much better image anyway, and I would make it a verticle. They seem to look too "eye-level, 50mm-ish" to me. If you want a scene setter, shoot wide and use the light to make a more dramatic image.

Duane
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Rodrigo Pena, Photographer
Palm Desert | CA | USA | Posted: 11:37 AM on 06.03.07
->> Scott I'd have to agree with Duane on everything he said.

The turnbuckle does not add anything but a distraction to the viewer's eye.

I kinda like some of your images that show the clock and the round, but you don't need that in every shot, maybe just one shot.

If you want atmosphere in your photos, Duane is right, get far back and shoot wide. Or shoot fans going crazy.
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Scott Foster, Photographer
Navarre | Fl | USA | Posted: 12:54 PM on 06.03.07
->> Thanks guys, that is on par w/what i expected [have got to work remind myself to just focus on the action in PP]. That is a major problem for me; I constantly look to include any sort of wall display or lit signage to give some depth to my mostly static black backgrounds. And the published result ALWAYS ends up tight & to the point.

EVERY real nice shot that catches my eye [ed/gavin/bello] is tight & "in your face" ~ but would you go so far as to crop off part of the arm/back of the fighter in the foreground if the shot was landing on the rear fighter [who is more centered in the frame?]
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Duane Burleson, Photographer
Sterling Heights | MI | USA | Posted: 4:12 PM on 06.03.07
->> "but would you go so far as to crop off part of the arm/back of the fighter in the foreground if the shot was landing on the rear fighter [who is more centered in the frame?]"


Yes, I would.

Duane
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Ed Mulholland, Photographer
Pompton Lakes | NJ | USA | Posted: 7:00 PM on 06.03.07
->> I agree with Duane in both his posts, most of the time "tight is right". You want the viewer to be pulled into the action, the majority of the time in boxing legs are not really important to the image, except maybe in the case of a knockdown, where I personally like to shoot wide to capture both fighters and the ref. #8 in my gallery that I just updated is an example of cropping out fighters backs/arms/legs that werent necessary in the shot.

If you are looking for atmosphere I'll zoom out to 24mm and shoot upwards a bit to get the fighters in full along with the ring and a large portion of the arena and crowd, but generally only works well at a larger sold out event...

Thanks for the mention Scott and good to see you aboard...
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Ed Mulholland, Photographer
Pompton Lakes | NJ | USA | Posted: 7:04 PM on 06.03.07
->> Sorry Scott, I meant #9 in my gallery...
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Scott Foster, Photographer
Navarre | Fl | USA | Posted: 8:05 PM on 06.03.07
->> That shot of Alvarez is a perfect example, Ed; makes me want to crop every uppercut that way [focus is in the center, not the edges]. Now if i can just pull the trigger in my pea brain & send out tightly cropped images I may save you some time on those Sunday morning editing sessions.

I'm guessing that mini-comback Alvarez staged in the 10th made up for Briggs' lethargic effort in the main event ~ spectacular shots of Shannon TOWERING over Sultan.
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Robert Hanashiro, Photographer
Los Angeles | CA | | Posted: 11:03 AM on 06.04.07
->> As I said over and over in my lecture on editing and cropping at the Sports Shooter Academy: Crop for impact.

Every photograph is different. And every person has an opinion. But the philosophy should be to look at the photograph, decide what is the most important storytelling element and crop to accentuate that.

To add to this is something that Mr. Brad Mangin says during his critiques: "Backgrounds, backgrounds, backgrounds." In this case, it would have been easy to crop out that beer logo on the right.
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Scott Foster, Photographer
Navarre | Fl | USA | Posted: 6:28 PM on 06.04.07
->> Thanks for all the advice ~ every shot I have re-cropped [tighter] looks far better than the original & packs much more of a punch.
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Thread Title: Cropping & Boxing
Thread Started By: Scott Foster
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