Story   Photographer   Editor   Student/Intern   Assistant   Job/Item

SportsShooter.com: The Online Resource for Sports Photography

Contents:
 Front Page
 Member Index
 Latest Headlines
 Special Features
 'Fun Pix'
 Message Board
 Educate Yourself
 Equipment Profiles
 Bookshelf
 my.SportsShooter
 Classified Ads
 Workshop
Contests:
 Monthly Clip Contest
 Annual Contest
 Rules/Info
Newsletter:
 Current Issue
 Back Issues
 Subscribe
Members:
 Members Area
 "The Guide"
 Join
About Us:
 About SportsShooter
 Contact Us
 Terms & Conditions


Sign in:
Members log in here with your user name and password to access the your admin page and other special features.

Name:



Password:







||
SportsShooter.com: Member Message Board

Canon ST-E2 question
Dave Yoder, Photographer
Milan | IT | Italy | Posted: 7:47 AM on 06.27.05
->> I'm thinking about getting this for use with my 580EX and have a question I couldn't find answered in the archives.

I will be using it almost exclusively for close-range subjects. I will NOT be using it to light big rooms or with multiple strobes, pretty much only strobe in hand off camera, with the flash generally an arm's length from the transmitter.

However the diagram I've seen of the line of sight ranges look very limiting. I'll be using it well outisde that range--over my head, off to the side, all pretty sharp angles.

Will it still work this way? Is there enough bounce in the infrared to still communicated between flash and transmitter even though well out of "line of sight"? ETTL is critical for me so the other wireless models aren't really an option, unless I suppose I go with a Quantum dedicated system, but then we're talking $$.

thanks in advance

dave
 This post is:  Informative (0) | Funny (0) | Huh? (0) | Off Topic (0) | Inappropriate (0) |   Definitions

Greg Bartram, Photographer
Dublin | OH | USA | Posted: 8:09 AM on 06.27.05
->> I use mine all the time shooting events/weddings, and I handhold my flash, and put that sucker all over the place. I rarely have a misfire. I haven't used my off-camera shoe cord in I dunno how long. Depending on what you're doing, you can put one flash on-camera as the master, and dial it back about a half-stop, then have one off-camera at full power. Softens up the shadows a bit that way.

One thing I can tell you from a note-comparing with the local newspaper shooters...they hated theirs, I loved mine. After talking a bit, we discovered that they had their cameras focusing in servo, while I had mine in one-shot. I tested mine in servo, and it was much less reliable.

Definitely works better inside/at night than outside on a sunny day, though.
 This post is:  Informative (0) | Funny (0) | Huh? (0) | Off Topic (0) | Inappropriate (0) |   Definitions

Jack Kurtz, Photographer
Phoenix | AZ | United States | Posted: 9:25 AM on 06.27.05
->> The line of sight diagrams from Canon are not very accurate. If you are indoors, especially in a small room, the you can actually point the ST-E2 and flash in opposite directions and everything will still work (because their IR signals bounce around the room much as the flash does). If you are outdoors, especially during the day, you have to be very careful to make sure the flash and ST-E2 see each other.

jack
 This post is:  Informative (0) | Funny (0) | Huh? (0) | Off Topic (0) | Inappropriate (0) |   Definitions

Mike Pittman, Photographer
Cary | NC | USA | Posted: 9:42 AM on 06.27.05
->> Dave: PUG POWER!

I love my ST-E2. I shoot weddings and such, and use it all the time. I don't, however, setup multiple flashes like some do. I try to keep it simple. I use mine primarily so I don't have to worry about that stupid TTL cord that Canon makes only being 1 foot long (it seems) and getting tangled in anything and everything in site.

For what you describe, it should work perfectly. The best thing I like is that if you have someone standing around you trust to hold your flash for you, you can get some really nice lighting setups without any extra effort. It's good to me.
 This post is:  Informative (0) | Funny (0) | Huh? (0) | Off Topic (0) | Inappropriate (0) |   Definitions

Robert Meyer, Student/Intern, Photographer
Lincoln | NE | United States | Posted: 10:03 AM on 06.27.05
->> Can you use pocket wizards with the 580EXs as an alternative to the ST-E2 transmitter?
 This post is:  Informative (0) | Funny (0) | Huh? (0) | Off Topic (1) | Inappropriate (0) |   Definitions

Chris Keane, Student/Intern, Photographer
Charlotte | NC | USA | Posted: 10:18 AM on 06.27.05
->> Dave -
You said your only going to be holding the strobe an arm's length from your camera. Why not look at the off camera cord? I have the ST-E2 and use it sometimes when I'm indoors and want to place the strobe on a light-stand. But most of my off camera strobe is done within arms reach with the off camera cord.

Chris
 This post is:  Informative (0) | Funny (0) | Huh? (0) | Off Topic (0) | Inappropriate (0) |   Definitions

Clark Brooks, Photo Editor, Photographer
Urbana | IL | USA | Posted: 10:33 AM on 06.27.05
->> Robert: Yes, you can use PWs to trigger 580's.

Dave: For small room applications, 400sqft or so, you should be fine using the STE. If the walls are white I don't think you will have a problem at all. But if you are going to hand hold the flash in every useage, getting the off-camera cord will be a cheaper, more reliable option.

If the cord is too short I've read some folks here on SS have made their own extensions using CAT5 cable and an off camera cord 2.
 This post is:  Informative (0) | Funny (0) | Huh? (0) | Off Topic (0) | Inappropriate (0) |   Definitions

Frank Casimiro, Photographer
Sugar Land (Houston Area) | TX | USA | Posted: 10:42 AM on 06.27.05
->> I use my ST-E2 all the time as you describe your intended usage to be. Both inside and out I never experience a problem. I find it more convenient than the off camera cord. I also use it to fire multiple flash units for on site shoots. It's been a very handy device I keep in my bag.

Frank
 This post is:  Informative (0) | Funny (0) | Huh? (0) | Off Topic (0) | Inappropriate (0) |   Definitions

Stanley Hu, Photographer
Cambridge | MA | USA | Posted: 11:02 AM on 06.27.05
->> One downside of the ST-E2 that isn't mentioned much is that the zoom on the flash doesn't adjust automatically with the focal length of your lens. If you're shooting with a 24-70mm lens, for example, then you have to manually set the flash zoom each time you change the zoom.

Does anyone else find this to be a problem?
 This post is:  Informative (0) | Funny (0) | Huh? (0) | Off Topic (0) | Inappropriate (0) |   Definitions

Dave Yoder, Photographer
Milan | IT | Italy | Posted: 8:15 AM on 06.28.05
->> thanks all,

I have the cord and that's what i'm trying to replace because it keeps getting in the way and isn't long enough. I shoot some things quite often without looking through the finder (just love that 20D focus point toggle!) while getting even more distance between the flash and body (nearly full armspan instead of just one arm length) and the cord just totally gets in the way.

Sounds like it might work for what I'd like to use it for... I think...
 This post is:  Informative (0) | Funny (0) | Huh? (0) | Off Topic (0) | Inappropriate (0) |   Definitions

Clark Brooks, Photo Editor, Photographer
Urbana | IL | USA | Posted: 10:24 AM on 06.28.05
->> http://www.sportsshooter.com/message_display.html?tid=9308

Dave:
Above it the link to thread about making an extension for your OCC2. Good luck!

Clark
 This post is:  Informative (0) | Funny (0) | Huh? (0) | Off Topic (0) | Inappropriate (0) |   Definitions

Charlie Hicks, Photographer
Papillion | NE | USA | Posted: 10:33 AM on 06.28.05
->> Robert:

You can use a PW to fire a 580 or most other flashes but you'll loose E-TTL in the process.

The ST-E2 provides E-TTL, remote setting of flash ratios, high-speed sync, etc. You can even have three groups of flashes for remote control.

However, with Pocket Wizards you gain longer ranges that don't have to be "in sight" of the IR beam on the ST-E2 because the PW use radio signals. You can have multiple flashes, multiple flashes on different channels, etc.

There's a place for both setups. I use both, depending on what I'm shooting. For weddings and some portraits/groups, like Mike, I use the ST-E2 for quick setups - add a second or third flash to fill shadows or light up an area.

I use the PW most for remote lights in gyms and my studio lights.

Charlie
 This post is:  Informative (0) | Funny (0) | Huh? (0) | Off Topic (0) | Inappropriate (0) |   Definitions

Frank Casimiro, Photographer
Sugar Land (Houston Area) | TX | USA | Posted: 10:34 AM on 06.28.05
->> In case you didn't see this, here is a informative story on some of the possibilities the ST-E2 and Canon Flashes.

http://www.sportsshooter.com/news/450

Frank
 This post is:  Informative (0) | Funny (0) | Huh? (0) | Off Topic (0) | Inappropriate (0) |   Definitions

Dave Yoder, Photographer
Milan | IT | Italy | Posted: 3:03 PM on 06.28.05
->> If the Canon strobes had auto modes like Nikon, using a PW setup might be manageable, but they don't. I'm talking about for use with fluid unmanipulated situations. I think ETTL is a must.

Really the only question in my mind is how reliable they'll be in weird situations like fired from below the camera or whatever. I just want to be able to get experimental with no hassles. The cord, any length, is a hassle.
 This post is:  Informative (0) | Funny (0) | Huh? (0) | Off Topic (0) | Inappropriate (0) |   Definitions

Frank Casimiro, Photographer
Sugar Land (Houston Area) | TX | USA | Posted: 5:07 PM on 06.28.05
->> I was in the same boat. I didn’t like the length of the cord and the hassle. I have fired mine from below, above, to the side with no problems. You can always swivel the flash head so the sensor on the flash point more toward the controller mounted on the camera.

If in doubt, fire the flash with the FEL button to see if the range is in reach.

For hand held at that short of a distance you should have very few problems if any at all.

Go for it....

Frank
 This post is:  Informative (0) | Funny (0) | Huh? (0) | Off Topic (0) | Inappropriate (0) |   Definitions

Michael Fischer, Photographer
Spencer | Ia | USA | Posted: 12:05 AM on 06.30.05
->> I have only had the ST-E2 a couple of months or so, but I really like it. It has some limitations, but as an alternative to setting up bigger strobes with PWs, it's worked really well.

It's a great tool to have in your bag from my perspective.
 This post is:  Informative (0) | Funny (0) | Huh? (0) | Off Topic (0) | Inappropriate (0) |   Definitions

Randy Janoski, Photographer
Chapel Hill | TN | USA | Posted: 12:39 AM on 06.30.05
->> I use the ST-E2 quite a bit also, indoors and outdoors. One trick I (and several others) use is to adhere reflective Mylar "flags" to each side of the 550 or 580s sensor. That increases your range outdoors and allows you to "see" around corners and door ways to some extent indoors.

As for an extension cable I have made several up of various lengths up to 25 feet. If your handy and have good dexterity try this link,

http://fototime.com/AFD57D696EE4AB4/orig.jpg

Also instead of cutting the Canon cord and using the DIN connectors you can make solid extensions by going right into the Canon end pieces.
 This post is:  Informative (1) | Funny (0) | Huh? (0) | Off Topic (0) | Inappropriate (0) |   Definitions

Dave Yoder, Photographer
Milan | IT | Italy | Posted: 11:03 AM on 07.03.05
->> What are mylar flags?

I put up pictures on my member page that show mainly what I have in mind for the use of the ST-E2, and would appreciate comments as to whether anyone thinks I'd run into the sensor coverage problems in these types of situations. Please remember the flash will very often be waaaaay outside the Canon diagram of range, and I'm hoping the close quarters will allow for some bounce or something like that to send the data to the flash.

Thanks all for the help and happy Fourth from an ex-pat!

dave
 This post is:  Informative (0) | Funny (0) | Huh? (0) | Off Topic (0) | Inappropriate (0) |   Definitions

Steven E. Frischling, Photographer, Photo Editor
New England | | USA | Posted: 12:19 PM on 07.03.05
->> Randy

What is a Mylar flag? Where can I find such an item? It sounds like a good solution to a number of range problem.
 This post is:  Informative (0) | Funny (0) | Huh? (0) | Off Topic (0) | Inappropriate (0) |   Definitions

Greg Bartram, Photographer
Dublin | OH | USA | Posted: 9:01 AM on 07.04.05
->> Response to Stanley...

I use Stofen Omnibounce on my flashes, so the zoom factor isn't an issue.
 This post is:  Informative (0) | Funny (0) | Huh? (0) | Off Topic (0) | Inappropriate (0) |   Definitions

Dave Yoder, Photographer
Milan | IT | Italy | Posted: 12:39 PM on 07.15.05
->> OK I've picked up a unit and it seems to be just what I'm looking for. I got it used though without a manual, and figured out on my own the basics. At least, it's working.

One question though about exposure compensation. It only seems to apply the in-camera compensation from my 20D's to my 580EX. Is there a way for it to use the in-flash compesations from the dial? There's a 1-stop greater range and i've dialed down to -3 on many occasions...
 This post is:  Informative (0) | Funny (0) | Huh? (0) | Off Topic (0) | Inappropriate (0) |   Definitions

Randy Janoski, Photographer
Chapel Hill | TN | USA | Posted: 3:31 PM on 07.15.05
->> Dave, Steve and anyone else that's interested. I guess I should look back at threads that I post to a bit more often!

Anyway "Mylar Flags" are small pieces of Mylar shaped somewhat like wings of a butterfly and attached to each side of the IR sensor area. They need not be bigger than 2 X 3 inches or so.

Mylar can be found at many art or craft stores. It is similar to film and is available in different mil thickness. Reflective Mylar is kind of like aluminum foil but much more durable, it is 95%-99% reflective. It is used quite allot in hydroponics and other gardening. If you do a web search for "reflective Mylar" you'll find several sources.

I use tiny strips of Velcro to adhere the Mylar to my flash units. I use mine with umbrella, soft box or flash only setups. They do help outdoors in extending the IR range and indoors you can use them to help an IR signal "peek" through door openings to get strobes firing in other rooms in the scene.
 This post is:  Informative (0) | Funny (0) | Huh? (0) | Off Topic (0) | Inappropriate (0) |   Definitions

Add your comments...
If you'd like to add your comments to this thread, use this form. You need to be an active (paying) member of SportsShooter.com in order to post messages to the system.

NOTE: If you would like to report a problem you've found within the SportsShooter.com website, please let us know via the 'Contact Us' form, which alerts us immediately. It is not guaranteed that a member of the staff will see your message board post.
Thread Title: Canon ST-E2 question
Thread Started By: Dave Yoder
Message:
Member Login:
Password:




Return to -->
Message Board Main Index
What Are You Getting Yourself Into......... A Clue ::..